Trainer's Tips and Tricks

Our trainers are such a valuable part of our team.  We're so thankful to have them help, not only when things don't go the we want, but also on a preventative and proactive capacity through education and training.

Below are some helpful 'Tips and Tricks' from our training staff on various topics including nutrition, hydration, training recovery and concussions.

THE PREGAME MEAL PLANNER

A Guide for High-School Athletes

 

North Central Regional Extension Publication 564

 

http://web.aces.uiuc.edu/vista/pdf_pubs/PREGAME.PDF

 

WHAT YOU EAT EVERY DAY CAN HAVE A BIG EFFECT ON HOW YOU PERFORM.

 

WHAT YOU EAT RIGHT BEFORE AN EVENT CAN BE CRITICAL!

 

WRONG CHOICES CAN BE DISASTROUS!

 

RIGHT CHOICES CAN GIVE YOU THAT COMPETIITIVE EDGE.

 

THE PREGAME MEAL PLANNER WILL HELP YOU MAKE WISE FOOD CHOICES!

 

While the pregame meal can supply your body with significant amounts of energy,  don't expect it to supply all the energy you'll need for the event. You should eat the right kinds of foods for several days before the event to charge up your muscles glycogen. Glycogen is a key energy source your muscles use during most sports activities. Although the pregame meal won't cause large increases in muscle glycogen, it will:

 

  • Help avoid hunger during the event

  • Stabilize blood sugar levels and add some food energy to compliment existing energy stores of muscle glycogen

  • Hydrate the body (supply water to the cells)

  • Provide a relatively empty stomach at game time

  • Prevent gastrointestinal upset or other adverse reactions to food

 

No one pregame meal is right for every athlete or every event, but some food choices are smarter than others. General guidelines for individual food selection and meal planning follow. Make sure your pregame meal plans follow these guidelines.

 

PREGAME GUIDELINES

 

  • Allow enough time for digestion. Eat your meal at least 3 hours prior to the event

  • Choose a meal that is high in starch. Starch is easy to digest and helps steady the levels of blood sugar

  • Consume only moderate amounts of protein. Protein foods take longer to digest than starch. High protein meals may lead to increased urine production, which can add to dehydration

  • Limit fats and oils. They take too long to digest

  • RESTRICT SUGARY FOODS - sweets can cause rapid energy swings in blood sugar levels and result in low blood sugar and less energy

  • AVOID foods and drinks that contain caffeine! Caffeine stimulates the body to increase urine output, which can contribute to dehydration problems, and a full bladder can be very uncomfortable.

  • Watch out for foods that produce gas! Certain raw vegetables, fruits or beans may cause problems for some athletes. Be aware of foods that cause you problems, and avoid them just before an event.

  • Within these guidelines, choose foods you like to eat

  • Remember to drink plenty of fluids

 

 

If you need more information to plan nutritious meals, get a free copy of Don't Let Your Diet Let You Down - A Guide for High-School Athletes, University of Illinois Circular 1044, write to Publications, 69 Mumford Hall, 1301 West Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801.

 

© 2019 by Scots Football, Archbishop Jordan High School, Sherwood Park, Alberta